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All Posts By

Andrew Stemler

Restart a Heart day at Crossfit London UK

 

Each year the Resuscitation Council runs  “Restart a Heart” day in October. Crossfit London, with help from the St John Ambulance ( Leytonstone Branch), will be running an evening of free CPR training at its Bethnal Green venue from 5.30pm on Thursday 17th October.

Every 30 minutes we will have room to teach 8 people how to do CPR and use a defibrillator. Unlike a lot of London Gyms, we actually have our own defibrillator onsite. You might as well know how to use it.

So just rock up at 5.30/6/6.30/7/7.30/8pm and head for reception.

This is mainly for our members but all are welcome but  the address is railway Arch 30, 150 Buckhurst St E1 5QT

Here is are some fun facts about Cardiac arrest

  • A cardiac arrest is when the heart’s electrical supply is interrupted resulting in the heart stopping pumping blood around the body.
  • The heart is a pump, which supplies oxygenated blood to all of the body, which is vital for bodily function.
  • If someone’s had a cardiac arrest, they’ll be unconscious, not breathing or not breathing normally.
  • Call 999 immediately.
  • All the cells in your body require oxygen to survive. They also require a good supply of nutrients and the rapid removal of waste products. Oxygen and nutrients are carried
around the body in your blood, which is pumped by your heart. In your lungs, oxygen enters your blood stream and carbon dioxide (a waste product) is removed in a process known as gas exchange. A cardiac arrest is when your heart stops beating. This is not the same as a heart attack, although a heart attack may lead to a cardiac arrest.
  • There are numerous causes of cardiac arrests, including:
    • –  A disturbance in the heart rhythm
    • –  Drugs/poisoning
    • –  Heart disease/a heart attack
    • –  Traumatic injury/blood loss
    • –  Anaphylaxis (allergic reaction)
  • If a cardiac arrest occurs, blood will stop circulating around the body. Breathing will also cease as well though it may not stop completely for several minutes. Without a supply of oxygen, the cells in the body start to die. Brain cells are incredibly sensitive. After about three to four minutes of no oxygen, brain cells will begin dying, leading to brain damage and death.
  • The purpose of CPR is to keep oxygenated blood owing around the body to keep the vital organs alive. CPR itself will not restart someone’s heart; it just keeps them alive until a defibrillator arrives. A defibrillator is a device that delivers an electrical shock to the heart to restart it.
  • Over 30,000 people suffer cardiac arrests outside of hospital in the UK every year. If this happens in front of a bystander who starts CPR immediately before the arrival of the ambulance, the victim’s chances of survival double or triple.
  • Today, if you suffer a cardiac arrest out of hospital in the UK, you have less than a one in ten chance of surviving.
  • Chain of Survival – Early Recognition, Early CPR, Early Call for Help, Early Defibrillation. A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Bystander intervention is vital to improve outcomes.
  • Compressions should be at the rate 100-120 per minute, 5-6cm compressing the chest and a ratio of 30 compressions to two breaths pressing on the centre of the chest between the nipples.
  • Chest compressions and ventilations slow down the rate of deterioration of the brain and heart.
  • If a bystander is unwilling to do mouth-to-mouth, hands-only CPR is fine, with the simple message ‘hard and fast’ in the centre of the chest to the beat of ‘Staying Alive’. It is most likely that the students we are teaching will see one of their family members in cardiac arrest so they will be more inclined to deliver rescue breaths if it is a family member.
  • With each minute’s delay of delivering a defibrillation shock to a shockable cardiac arrest, the chances of survival decrease by 10-12%. Public Access Defibrillators are very easy to use and widely available.
  • Some people are afraid of performing CPR for fear of worsening the situation but if the victim does not receive CPR there is a good chance that they will die. On occasion, when performing chest compressions it is possible that ribs may be heard to crack, this is normal and not something to worry about.

Gymnastic Skills Clinic for Crossfitters

There are several tricky gymnastic based moves in Crossfit that you  need to get:

Muscle ups
Handstand push ups
Kipping and Toes to bar

There is a fantastic opportunity, this Saturday,  at Crossfit London in Bethnal Green E2, to have some expert tuition from some of Crossfit London’s top coaches. They will either help you nail these skills, or help you lay the foundations for those drills and practices that will mean you’ll be “kipping and Stuff” in the near future.

Crossfit Kids in Bethnal Green E2

Bethnal Green is the place to be! Especially if you want your kids to develop as awesome people. We have a fabulous weekly class where kids aged 8-14 learn a stack of essential cool skills such as weightlifting, powerlifting, and strength gymnastics. Quickly we include these skills in workouts that build their  cardio vascular and endurance capacity .

Recently we asked one of the parents what they liked about the sessions. Surprisingly they didn’t obsess about how good their child’s deadlift was, or how fast their child’s 400m was or how well they rowed or how many pull ups, handstand walks and ring dips their child could now do do.

They sent us this statement.  They  pointed out this statement  wasn’t original and had been  taken from a post they had seen somewhere, but it  summed up how they felt about what their child was actually doing.

“I don’t pay for my children to  do Crossfit . Personally, I couldn’t care less  about what sporting or physical activity they do.

– I pay for those moments when my kids become so tired they want to quit but don’t.

– I pay for those days when my kids come home from school and are “too tired” to go to their training, but they go anyway.

– I pay for my kids to learn to be disciplined, focused and dedicated.

– I pay for my kids to learn to take care of their body and equipment.

– I pay for my kids to learn to work with others and to be good team mates, gracious in defeat and humble in success.

– I pay for my kids to learn to deal with disappointment, when they don’t get that placing or title they’d hoped for, but still they go back week after week giving it their best shot.

– I pay for my kids to learn to make and accomplish goals.

– I pay for my kids to respect, not only themselves, but other  trainees, officials and coaches.

– I pay for my kids to learn that it takes hours and hours, years and years of hard work and practice to create a champion and that success does not happen overnight.

– I pay for my kids to be proud of small achievements, and to work towards long term goals.

– I pay for the opportunity my kids have and will have to make life-long friendships, create lifelong memories, to be as proud of their achievements as I am.

– I pay so that my kids can be  in the gym instead of in front of a screen…

…I could go on but, to be short, I don’t pay for Crossfit ; I pay for the opportunities that Crossfit  provides my kids with to develop attributes that will serve them well throughout their lives and give them the opportunity to bless the lives of others. From what I have seen so far I think it is a great investment!”

Ww did some googling and found that this has been posted on the internet in other forms, but  no one knows who originally wrote it, but its great.

So with that bit of inspiration chiming in your soul, why not  drop  our  kids co-ordinator  an email and see if you can bring your child down for a chat, an interview and  a look around. There is some more information here

The week that will be : the Crossfit London overview

It looks to be an exciting week at Crossfit London UK in Bethnal Green E2. In this quick overview, we hope to give you an insight into the Crossfit programme over the next weeks along with a heads up about events and  other forth coming nice things.
CFLDN Partner Comp 2.0 is on Saturday, Sept 21 at 12pm. Mark this is your calendar as it promises to be THE event for the year!
And please invite friends, family, foes etc.
Crossfit Open rolls around again, with 19.1 dropping in on October 11.  Check out The Games Website and think about registering. We will expand our arrangements over the coming months
Programming
Last week saw the completion of the 531 strength cycle that we were working through for the past four months. We’ve seen terrific results from this cycle, with the PR bell ringing hot in the last two weeks. With these added strength gains, you’ll notice that your efficiency in WODs will improve (particularly when there’s a barbell involved), as strength is a key determiner in our ability to produce repeatable efforts.
Conditioning wise you may have noticed that we’re doing shorter, more intense workouts with dedicated rest intervals inserted. Reason being is that we’re working on an energy system called the lactic/anaerobic system, where we look to develop our ability to produce short bursts of energy and recover well. With this added intensity, we’re taking a break from strength BUILDING work, and will work more with strength MAINTENANCE – less sets and reps but high %’s. For example, we’re going from AMREP sets of back squats to 3×3 @85% This is designed to give your body a rest from the progressive strength work you’ve been doing, while still having the ability to move heavy weight around (without the cost of high reps).
We’re also adding in more skill work… This work is to be done at a lower heart rate, where we can work through their progressions. While working skill, it’s important that you master your progression for each movement here before taking the next step. For example, when we’re doing handstand walking, it’s important that we master the wall walk before moving onto the free standing walk.
We’ll continue with this cycle right up until the Crossfit Open in mid October, before moving on to another strength cycle and aerobic base building in December/January.
In the meantime, why not brush up your rowing technique. You should look like a noble viking, not a demented chimpanzee on speed. Here are some pointers. Its easy, but requires you to be relentless!

Squat clean problems? Its just like pulling people at parties!

Crossfit london In Bethnal Green E2 is famous for many, many things. The 1st ever British Crossfit affiliate, the 9th affiliate in the world, amazing olympic weightlifting classes, the best Crossfit beginner introduction process, its amazing clients, its fantastic coaches ( blah, blah, ). Its also famous for its  drill by drill instructional system and its use of allegory and metaphor to help people learn stuff!

The reality is that experiences in one part of your life, can often help elsewhere!

In other words, it’s possible to argue that the Olympic Lifts are wholly informed by your romantic, and for that matter, your pick up ability at parties.

The job of the  squat clean is to lift the bar to the correct height, no more and no less, then get underneath it.

Which is exactly like picking people up at parties

Have you ever met someone at a party and absolutely nailed it in the first few sentences?  Have you had one of those moments when you could literally have said “get your coat, you’ve pulled”, and got away with it?

Well done, but be honest,  you probably continued talking and  screwed it up.

Who hasn’t successfully hit on someone in a party  then proceeded to talk their way out of  what would have been a perfectly decent shag?

We’ve all been there.

And its the same with the  squat clean..

All you need to do is  A) pull the bar B) tell it  to “get your coat””  then  C) get under it . You have to ( and I mean , “HAVE TO” ) bring your hips all the way in. But, do you need to continue to pull? Do your arms  really need to tug it up further? Do you need that big  upward shoulder shrug… does the bar need to go sailing up past your chin to the moon before you decide you need to be going down the other way, and fast.

Once the bar is up by your chin in the pull, it’s too late. By this time the bar has thought better of it, it needs to think about things a bit.  Now it needs to check with a friend or wash its hair, or get a taxi home, and voila, there you are left all alone.

No PB for you tonight.

I mean that dents your pride and your ego.

I’ll forgo the shag, but to miss a clean . Ow!

Take home message, don’t overpull

The Partner Throwdown

It’s back!

Once more, Crossfit London  in Bethnal Green E2, hosts  a challenging, yet fun, functional fitness pairs competition featuring a blistering 5 wods in 70 minutes.

3 heats, 9 teams, Male + Male, Female + Female,  Scaled or Rx

Saturday Sept 21 from 12pm.

Crossfit London developed this amazingly popular format back in 2018 and it has gone  from strength to strength.  Increasingly teams from all over London are taking this opportunity to check out the amazing  facilities.  It’s not only a great training and competing environment, but the trainer team at Crossfit London are welcoming and inclusive.

You and your supporters can even chill out in our fabulous cafe area and taste our beautiful coffee and lovely shakes.

Use this event as a great opportunity to assess your Crossfit Open preparations

Saturday Sept 21 from 12pm.

Only £20 per person

To enter email Luke.Brumer@crossfitlondonuk.com

If you don’t get a pull up, no one will marry you

Once you have a few pull ups, it’s ‘easy’ to keep adding to them. The real hard one is getting that 1st pull up. After too many years hanging around and teaching in gyms, here is my ” how to do it” guide based on an original article  here

I hope it helps.

If you have no pull ups, here are some essential things you must do:

      1. Get a pull up bar at home. I’d say this won’t guarantee success, but not having one at home will guarantee failure. Do not rely on getting to the gym, or to us for that matter. Also it’s a private matter between you and the bar: basically you have bar “issues” and sometimes its best to deal with “issues” in private. This  pull up bar is often recommended  JML Iron Total Gym Upper Body Workout Bar
      2. Understand that a pull up is not a rubbishy exercise like all those silly pilates wiggles and squirms that you do. Pull-ups are a predictive happiness test. If you have no pulls ups  no-one of quality will want to marry you. If you refuse to get that first pull up, stop reading this and go and get some cats. That’s all you will be good for. If you say ” I don’t have a pull up, but Im married” my answer is stark. “You could have done better”!
      3. . Look honestly at your weight. Pull-ups will be harder to get if you are over-weight. That does not mean you wait until you are the “right weight”. Get going now. It will be harder, but as I often say: “you ate it, now hump it”.

(If you are overweight don’t set yourself the task of losing a few pounds before you do anything; start living your life now. If you are overweight, and are miserable because you are lonely and boyfriendless/girlfriendless/ loverless, put your details up on the raunchiest BBW site that your morality can stand, and hold on to your hat! Big girls and boys are always in demand. You can only lose weight if you are happy. Fending off would-be lovers with a stick is a very practical and measurable marker of happiness. Sitting at home feeling fat and ugly, makes you fat and ugly. Sorry, that not really about pull ups is it.)

Let us begin…

  • Objective 1: can you hang from the bar with your palms facing towards you (for those in the know, this is the ‘chin-up’ grip that’s a bit easier to begin with)?
  • Objective 2: can you hang a bit longer?
  • Objective 3: can you hang a bit longer than objective 2? (can you see where this is going?)

To save a lot of time, can you get to hang on your bar for 10 seconds? When you can, shout “woohoo” (loudly so as to annoy your neighbours) and start on working out how to do your first negative.

You’re first what?

Well in highly technical terms, right, there’s the pulling up bit (right?) and then there’s the lowering bit.

Innit?

At the moment you are not strong enough to do the pulling up bit, like, but if you were kind of already up there, maybe you could, er, lower yourself down a bit?

Alright!

Does sort of rather beg the question of “how do i get up there?”…

Well here is the Andrew Stemler “Getting it up guide” (apparently this is a good title that always sells):

      1. Jumping. Grab the pull up bar but instead of trying to pull yourself up, jump up so that your chin is above the bar. This can be easier said than done
      2. By standing on something. Just stand on something that is high enough for you to start out in that already-pulled-up position. A bench, a chair, whatever. Anything you can use as a mini-ladder would be perfect. Perhaps even a mini-ladder?
      3. Stand on something “version 2”.  Grab the bar and make your loser boy- or girlfriend  (perhaps the one you got from the BBW site) grab your ass and push you up

Now, once you’re in that top position, you’re ready to do the negative part of the pull-up. So, lower yourself down as slow and controlled as you possibly can. Focus on keeping really tight. I don’t mean “refuse to lend people money or get drunk”, I mean “have lots of tension in your body”. Squeeze (your own) bottom together. Brace your abs, squeeze your legs together.

Your first lower (we will call it negatives from now on) will either be agonisingly slow and hurt like hell, or you will fall straight through as you discover you have no strength at all.

Once you have lowered yourself, pop off the bar and reflect. Negatives are very taxing. You need rest between each one and you should never do more than 6 to 8 in a session.

So here is you beginner “CHIN-UPS FOR HAPPINESS” programme

Day  1: neg, neg, neg, neg, neg ( 120 secs rest between each negative)

Rest a day ( drink, eat cake, take all sorts of drugs. Smoking is especially good for you these days as it gets you out in the fresh air

Day 2: neg, neg, neg, neg, neg (90secs rest between each negative) It’s the same but with less rest!

Rest a day (put your own joke in!)

Day 3: neg, neg, neg, neg, neg (120 secs between each negative)

Rest one day

Day 4: The next workout needs you to get that loser boyfriend/girlfriend again. Basically they are going to try and help you pull yourself up and down. They get behind you, grab you…somewhere….(experiment) then they assist you to do….three sets of as many reps  as you can with 120 seconds between. So they grab you, and haul you up and down as many times as you can. Could be 1, you could do 2 or 6. The set is over when they cannot push you anymore, not when you feel like it. You will want to stop early as it feels as it you are not doing the work: in fact it’s mainly you.

Rest 120 seconds. Do it again 2 more times.

It’s my way of getting your body to see what the actual task is. No, a lat pull down machine is not a good substitution.

But, what if you cannot get anyone to help you? Well thats beyond this article: but ideas could be to go next door and bug your neighbour, call up your ex-wife. Perhaps the guy selling the Big Issue fancies a couple of quid extra. Get creative, and find someone. Join a religious group and offer to host a scripture reading and slip your set in before you start as “movement prayer”

Rest 2 days.

Day 5: neg, neg, neg,neg, neg (90 secs rest)

Rest 2 days.

Now it’s the big test. Get someone to help you do 1-2 easy, supported reps. Rest for 2 minutes. Then do your 1 chin-up (woohoo!) or hang there trying for a full 7 seconds. Then with 120 seconds rest neg, neg, neg.

If you get that pull up come and talk to us about getting more. If not return to the beginning and start again. If you are very weak it could take many passes through to get your first pull up. But this regime works.

Feel free to suggest improvements or funnier/ruder quips to comments.

My Name is Andrew Stemler and I’m a personal trainer  at CFLDN in Bethnal Green E2

Calisthenics and the 90/90 balloon drill

Inevitably the issue of breathing had to come up in our experimental Calisthenics class. Breathing can influence so may aspects of performance, that it’s worth becoming familiar with some of the more  popular breathing drills and concepts.

Increasingly you will see on cutting edged fitness blogs, the 90/90 breathing drill. As a cutting edge fitness class we looked at this skill last night.

The original 90/90 hip lift breathing drill was, to my knowledge, properly discussed by Boyle et al, ( 2010).

90/90 breathing was designed, so they say,  to optimise breathing and enhance posture and core stability. The idea being this would improve improve function and/or decrease pain (Boyle et al., 2010).

Here is a handy dandy “How to do it” guide

 

  1. Lie on your back,  feet flat on the wall, knees and hips bent at a 90- degree angle.
  2. Place a 4-6 inch ball between your knees.
  3. Place your right arm above your head and a balloon in your left hand.
  4. Inhale through your nose and exhale through your mouth, performing a pelvic tilt so that your tailbone is raised slightly off the mat. Keep your back flat on the mat. Do not press your feet flat into the wall instead dig down with your heels. You should feel your hamstrings “engage”
  5. Breath in through your nose and slowly blow out into the balloon.
  6. Pause three seconds with your tongue on the roof of your mouth.
  7. Without pinching the neck of the balloon and keeping your tongue on the roof of your mouth, take another breath in through your nose (the first few times you do this is slightly tricky).
  8. Slowly blow out  into the balloon again.
  9. Do not strain your neck or cheeks .
  10. The original instructions say “After the fourth breath in, pinch the balloon neck and remove it from your mouth.Let the air out of the balloon”. Frankly, i just open my mouth and let it fly around the room ( I have a pile of balloons to hand so I don’t have to move to get another one. My girlfriend says this is  annoying.
  11. Relax and repeat the sequence 4 more times.

You can checkout more materials at the Postural Rehabilitation Organisation

The 90/90 rests on a concept  called the zone of apposition (ZOA) of the diaphragm, which is the part of the muscle shaped like a dome.  In simple terms “MORE DOME GOOD”

If the ZOA is decreased the ability of the diaphragm to inhale sufficient air in a correct way is diminished.  This affects the diaphragms ability to build up  intra abdominal pressure.  If the ZOA is decreased The transversus abdominis activation also decreases with a smaller ZOA (Boyle et al, 2010), which again affects lumbar stabilisation ability .

The set up of 90/90 , allegedly aligns the pelvic floor and diaphragm in parallel. This combats any upper and lower cross syndromes, and lumbar extension. This results in  the core muscles being fired which increases the ZOA and adds to core stability. As an exercise in the obvious,  dysfunctional breathing and physical activity  takes up the main breathing muscles and throws the load on to smaller muscles and makes life harder. However, according to Lukas  (2018) there is little evidence in terms of studies to support this, although it sounds like a reasonable assumption. However, the Lukas study does seem to caste doubt on 90/90 as core stabilisation method

“Taken together, the 90/90 breathing seems rather ineffective as a general core activation for a normal workout.” (Lukas , 2018 page 35). but checkout these drills by Buteyko and these other breathing drills

I think some attention to basic breathing drills is probably useful, but its more relevant if you obviously have a breathing disfunction.

Why not practice on the tube (not with the balloon, obviously).

 

References

Alverdes, Lukas  (2018) .Short-term effects of 90/90 breathing with ball and balloon on core stability. Halmstad University

Boyle, K. L., Olinick, J., & Lewis, C. (2010). The value of blowing up a balloon. North American journal of sports physical therapy: NAJSPT, 5(3), 179.

 

COME & CHECK US OUT

Gymnastic strength, calisthenics, asanas

No matter what name you decide to call it, there are movements and static holds that say an awful lot about you. People who can plank, perform a lever, pop out a muscle up, hold a crow and get into the plough – are special.

Mastery of the asanas commonly associated with modern day yoga,  if combined with the famous moves associated with gymnastic strength: the human flag, the lever, the muscle up and the planche, begins the process of building awesome human beings. At CFLDN’s Crossfit Londons Bethnal Greens facility we want all our  athletes to learn how to control and manipulate external weights through regimes such as power and Olympic lifting while at the same time learning to  control and manipulate their own body weight.

Competency in these moves and the bodyweight ones in particular appear at a unique human cross-section. It’s where strength meets agility, flexibility, balance, endurance and mental calmness embraced within the mastery of technique.

Our Gymnastic-based classes represent an amazing challenge. There are, after all, gifts of health and vitality to be harvested.  However, there is a private hell to pass through as each stage is learned: perhaps only made tolerable by working with other committed, lovely people.

 

There is another key that underpins the value of  an asana, gymnastic-based process. You only learn cool moves one step at a time. In a world that worships ease convenience and instant gratification, there is a value in learning how to play the long game.

It develops grit.

It just makes you a better person.

COME & CHECK US OUT

Powerlifting testing day.

TESTING RESULTS AND BLOCK REVIEW

Today was testing day at CFLDN  In Bethnal Green E2. Alex Miller runs a popular powerlifting class to ensure our athletes build strength. Here is his review on todays testing results.

By ALEX MILLER

Obviously there is a lot of people still to test and some numbers to fill in but here is the initial results.

Overall numbers are going up. One or two people had off days today and performed under their potential but they have also been hitting higher numbers in their training so no need to worry there.

REVIEW OF THE COHORT SYSTEM:

As most of you are aware I introduced a cohort system into the Powerlifting training this block. The idea was that if I can provide ya’ll with some more individualised program that specific addresses a key weakness then you should respond with a larger increase in your numbers. To my eyes most people put around 7-10% on their numbers in the 12 weeks with, as you’d expect, some statistical outliers at a way higher %.

A key focus of the cohort system I made was to build the address the structural weakness which may have been an underlying cause of movement breakdown or poor technique. This resulted in a slightly less than traditional feel for a powerlifting class. Feedback was, from those I spoke with, that even though they aren’t leaving each session exhausted they feel that, even under high load, technique is much better.

DOWNSIDES:

I go away and review every block of training I prescribe to find out what I can do to make it better. The cohort system for powerlifting is no different. There is always downsides and if we are to create a resilient system which creates CFLDN athletes who are stronger, injury free, and technically superb then these flaws MUST be embraced and examined.

In this case, one of the biggest flaws I made was not giving enough time for sport practice: Squat, Bench, and Deadlift. The lifters had, at max, only 2 weeks of full lift practice before testing (during the the program they only did variations of the lifts which addressed the specific weaknesses of their cohort).

The second biggest flaw I made was to not give the athletes enough time to really get strong on each weak point variation. To limit the decreased response to specific adaptation demands I applied a 3 week limit to each variation. In hindsight, whilst it achieved that as a goal, it may prove better to run each variation for slightly longer (if you have questions on this ask me about adaptation refractory windows).

CONCLUSION:

Overall I’m very happy with the cohort system thus far and believe the results speak for themselves. As such, we will continue down the cohort path (although I clearly have a HUGE bias here and if anyone feels differently I’d love to hear your thoughts) but obviously, reflection (of which this is a quick overview) is useless without implementation of change; therefore, leading into the next block of training the following changes will be enacted:

– Each main lift variation will run for 5 weeks, rather than 3.
– After the 5 weeks, there will be a single week transition block to allow for re-sensitisation to the strength training stimuli.

This takes us to a 24 week block (4 x 6 weeks)

– At the 6 and 18 week mark, there will be a X3 block run of competition standard lifts. Because the block is X3 (i.e. triple occurrence per micro cycle or a 2 day micro cyle) the rate of adaption is much, much faster. Ergo, each block will only last 2 weeks.

This takes us to a 28 week block ( 4(6) + 2(2) )

At the end of the 28 weeks there will be a X2 competition block structured as a traditional linear taper/peak. This will last 3 weeks.

Taking us to a 31 week block ( 4(6) + 2(2) + 1(3)

And then a testing week totalling a 32 week block.

EXPECTATIONS

I know this seems like an extraordinary amount of time between testing. I’m hoping that the interim competition block attenuate that somewhat. Apart from that I’m happy just to suck it and see.

This long term approach to building the CFLDN athletes 100% rewards adherence but it will, in turn, hugely reward those who make the effort.

You can find out how to get functionally strong by following this link