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Juan Aranda

Aerobic Capacity is the Key to Intelligent Training

How often do you do your WODS at 120%? How often do your train to your strengths whether its endurance or a short WOD? If you are, then you could be limiting yourself and not reaching your potential as an athlete.

What’s the solution? – Think about training your aerobic capacity.

How does it work? Basically, your body has one energy currency – a chemical called adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Energy is released from molecules of ATP when they break apart and form another chemical called adenosine diphosphate (ADP). The snag is that you only have a limited store of ATP in your muscles, so to keep training, your body has to convert ADP back into ATP to keep releasing energy.

Still with me? The body uses three systems to release energy depending on your physical state: Creatine Phosphate (anearobic), Lactate (anearobic) and Aerobic (or oxygen). When you are physically active, the body can use all of these systems together but when you continue with activity, the right one for your physical effort and condition takes over.

So let’s break them down:

  • CP (anearobic) – This process creates energy for maximum exertion (1 RM – snatch or 100 metres sprint) but causes maximum exhaustion after 10 seconds. The system is restored after approx. 5 mins rest.
  • Lactate (anearobic) – This is your body’s energy safety net. It takes over when your CP is near exhaustion and also supports your aerobic work when there isn’t enough oxygen in your cells. But as we all know, depend too much on this and you get a lactic build up in your muscles which causes painful cramps.
  • Aerobic – Your cells actually produce more ATP when they have enough oxygen using carbohydrates, fat and protein in the cells. This process lasts as long as oxygen can be supplied, so using this energy system depends on the strength and efficiency of your heart and circulation.

So your body does this automatically right – like breathing? All you have to do is work your muscles and all three get better? Wrong! Although your body chooses which system to use depending on your state and activity, you can improve the resistance of each system if you train them specifically.

The aerobic capacity is the big daddy – the Don Corleone of the three. If you work on this, then generally you can improve your performance in the other two systems. But if you push too hard, then your cells will exhaust their oxygen supply and you move into the lactate anaerobic system.

Think about it – your aerobic capacity is your ability to sustain a certain level of effort over a period of time without you needing a significant rest. If you have just finished a WOD and you are lying on the floor too exhausted to even think about how you are going to get home, you went beyond your aerobic capacity. To train effectively, you need to train within the aerobic zone. You should only go full out when you are testing or competing.

If you train your aerobic capacity, you will improve your overall resistance, performance and work capacity but you have to stay in the aerobic zone.

Are you ready to train intelligently?

Love from the latino coach.

Member of the Week: 3 November 2017

This week’s member of the week goes to

Kieron Lyons

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Kieron has been  training  with us since the beginning  of the year, I recently got to see him in action after some time and is great to see that with hard work and dedication he’s making great progress. 

Well  done, keep up the hard work!!

Member of the Week: 7 July 2017

This week’s Member of the Week goes to



Paula Pastorelli

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Paula hasn’t been with us for a long time but she’s making great progress. It’s hard enough to understand and learn good technique when it’s in your own language – it’s even harder when you are doing it in another language that is not your own and keep a smile on your face while doing it. Parabens Paula!!!